44-03-13 Letter from Stella Klank

STARRING: ART VAN HARVEY AND BERNARDINE FLYNN
  • Vic is obsessed with dinner, which isn't ready, and Sade wants to read Stella's letter to him to show him it's "inconsequential trash."
  • Stella (who lives in Dixon) mentions: Nelson Klunk and Lottie McVirtchel in Marengo; Jeanette and Ocky McMasterson, who own a fake piano, visited.  Mr. Furgleson will travel with Nelson to Sweet Esther, Wisconsin on business.  Ed and Wanda Tretson are moving to Dismal Seepage, Ohio. they used to live in Sick River Junction, where Ed worked as an armed guard at the Missouri Home For the Tall. They're expecting a fourth child in July. Little Donald has been staying with his grandma in Topeka for two weeks.  Fern and Albert Greetch dropped past.  Helen and Butler Chonk are moving to a house out of town.  Butler didn't make a go of the faded overall business.  Helen wants him to go back to giving violin lessons, but music jangles his nerves.
  • Sade's afraid if she answers the letter she'll get involved in an  unending exchange of meaningless drivel.  Vic puts aside his hunger pangs long enough to suggest Sade's exchanges with her sister Bess are no more meaningful.  Sade says that's different – sisters.
  • Back to the letter: Fist and Isabelle Maloney, Art and Dorothy Koog, Findlay and Bertha Spence are forming a glee club.
  • Vic (commenting on a hint of spring in the air): "Little vernal zephyrs perfume the ozone." - compiled by Barbara Schwarz, edited by Jimbo Mason
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Vic stepped on a landmine that didn't explode when he talks about Bess's letters being inconsequential.

As we have learned previously, Sweet Esther is not just a popular destination for lodge members.

The Gooks and Uncle Fletcher know of a handful of armed guards who work for the Missouri Home for the Tall.

The "faded overall business" was a joke then - now faded blue jean products are money-makers.

A simple but funny name mentioned in the letter: Butler Chonk.

According to the book, Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series, this episode is dated February 9, 1944.  

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