37-04-07 Exciting Information

[All of the following is quoted directly from John T. Hetherington, author of Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series, from the article, "Little Gossips"]:

In the April 7, 1937 episode Sade reports on some “exciting information” that she has heard from Mis’ Donahue, who heard it from Mis’ Razorscum, who got it from Mis’ Drummond: Mis’ Drummond bought a “half a ton of little white stones” (p.6). Sade has concluded, through a series of deductions, that Mis’ Drummond is planning to dump them in the Gooks’ backyard until she’s ready to use them to decorate her garden – nearly two months later. Needless to say, Sade’s not pleased about this.
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OK, this isn’t the most scintillating gossip; however, there are a couple of things that make this memorable to me. First, there’s the complicated flow of information that Sade must recount to Vic as she tells him what she’s learned. Then there’s the trouble she has trying to share the gossip in the first place. You see, when she arrives home from Mis’ Donahue’s Vic is trying to read the newspaper and Rush is busy trying to persuade him to let him try out a new wrestling hold that Rooster has come up with, a “combination half-nelson an’ belly-jab.” (p.1). At one point as Sade tries to impart her “exciting information” she gets annoyed with Rush, who, unable to entice either Vic or Sade into letting him practice  the hold on them, has taken to trying to practice it on himself. Exasperated, Sade tells him to “go out-doors somewhere an’ choke yourself” (p.4). Given that Sade so rarely lets either Rush or Russell complete a story, I think it appeals to my sense of justice when Sade is confronted with the same problem.

Finally, after trying to follow Sade’s saga of the half-ton of little white stones, Vic turns to Rush:
VIC: You say you had a new wresting hold?
RUSH: You bet. Combination half-nelson an’ belly jab.
VIC: Is it painful?
RUSH: Terrifically so.
VIC: Try it out on me.
p.10
That just about says it all! A terrifically painful combination half-nelson an’ belly jab wins out over enduring Sade’s complex chain of gossip and its potential ramifications anytime!

33-06-14 Rush Gets Kissed by Mis' Wilcox

[The following is quoted from John T. Hetherington in an interview with Jimbo, published May 27, 2014]

Vic has come home early and is hiding outside talking with Rush while Sade entertains the ladies inside. Rush has been avoiding Mis’ Wilcox for fear she would want to kiss him; however, his plan doesn’t work:
WILCOX: Your mother didn’t tell us you were out here. I came out in the kitchen to get a drink of water. Just happened to see you. My, what a big boy you’re getting to be. And cute, too. I just…
RUSH: My face is dirty, Mis’ Wilcox.
WILCOX: (LAUGHING) Oh, that’s all right. Here. (KISS) (LAUGHS).
RUSH: Thanks for the kiss, Mis’ Wilcox.
Interestingly, Mis’ Wilcox had several other lines in the script that had been crossed out.
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Before my interview with Hetherington, it was written in a newspaper article that the first person (other than the Gooks) to speak in a Vic and Sade episode was Mr. Gumpox, in 1938.  We now know that to be wrong.

Though not stated by Hetherington, we can assume this was at a Thimble Club meeting, outside the Gook home.  We know that Mis' Wilcox was a Thimble Club member.

35-xx-xx Rush Gets a Job at Consolidated Kitchenware

According to author John T. Hetherington, "Rush had a job at Vic’s plant in 1935."

[Stated by Hetherington in an interview with Jimbo, published May 27, 2014]

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

34-02-13 At the Miller Park Zoo

According to author John T. Hetherington, There's a "Very charming scene between Sade and Rush at the animal house at the city park."

[Stated by Hetherington in an interview with Jimbo, published May 27, 2014]

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

34-02-09 Beans, Beans, Beans

According to author John T. Hetherington, "Vic [is] rhapsodizing about the 'world of ecstasy' the word 'beans' implies and prophesizing that he will be playing “beans, beans, beans” on his harp when he goes to meet his 'reward'."

[Stated by Hetherington in an interview with Jimbo, published May 27, 2014]

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

33-11-17 Rush Gives a Fruit Party

According to author John T. Hetherington, "Rush planned a 'fruit party' for his teacher with rotten fruit because it was less expensive than fresh fruit."

[Stated by Hetherington in an interview with Jimbo, published May 27, 2014]

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

33-06-14 Rush's Cool Shoes

According to author John T. Hetherington, "Rush came up with an idea about shoes that worked like an electric icebox."

[Stated by Hetherington in an interview with Jimbo, published May 27, 2014]

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

33-05-08 New Kitchenware Dealer's Quarterly

STARRING: ART VAN HARVEY, BERNARDINE FLYNN AND BILL IDELSON

Sade tries her best to get Vic to help clean the house but he uses the new Kitchenware Dealer's Quarterly magazine to keep her at bay.

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

[The gist of this episode was revealed in the book, Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series]

32-06-26 Audition #2

STARRING: ART VAN HARVEY AND BERNARDINE FLYNN

According to author John T. Hetherington's book (Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series), Vic and Sade had a second audition in late June, 1932. [Note: No "audition" (other than the one from February of 1932) is ever mentioned in the notes from Barbara Schwarz.  The John Dunning book, On the Air, An Encyclopedia of Old-time Radio, lists the first show as June 29, 1932.  So who knows?]

The Hetherington book doesn't quite say, but the "2nd audition" could be a rehash of the first one.

Some details are given though, such as the fact that Sade doesn't seem to trust newspapers.  One story is revealed to Vic by Sade, about something she read: a man shot his lady friend with a glass eye and a slingshot.

Hetherington goes on to describe a sensationalized media in that era and gives another example of Sade not trusting the newspaper.

40-02-08 Captured by Third Lieutenant Stanley

While Rush is away, both Vic and Sade find themselves caught up in reading copies of Third Lieutenant Stanley adventure books.
_______________________
Vic is reading Third Lieutenant Stanley Amid the Frozen Alps or Mystery of the Poisoned Moccasin.

Sade is reading Third Lieutenant Stanley's Big Affair, a book Rush borrowed from Blue Tooth Johnson.

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

[The gist of this episode was revealed in the book, Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series]

43-01-15 Uncle Fletcher Cleans Out His Room

Fine!
Mis' Keller, Uncle Fletcher's landlady, has asked him to clean some junk out of the room he rents.  He does and carries it over to his niece's house - expecting Sade to return the items to the store!

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

[The gist of this episode was revealed in the book, Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series]

35-01-09 Composition and Snowball Fight

The long-imagined (by the Vic and Sade fan) other neighborhood nemesis comes to life as Rush is weighed down by a school composition -- while the coming throes of a terrible snowball fight with Bulldog Drummond looms.

Rush talks Gov into doing the composition for him, while he makes mushy snowballs in a bucket at the kitchen table.
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Just earlier in this same week, Rush was admonished, for cheating/not doing his own work; here he is four days later, cheating again.  (This point was brought up in John T. Hetherington's book: Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series; this book is also where I found the synopsis of this episode.)

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

33-09-21 Rush's Four-page Composition

"Woosh!"
Rush has trouble compiling a four-page school composition on the dog, man's best friend.

He decides to gain some help from those who have already written about dogs and grabs those books from the bookcase.

Sade sees that Rush is copying from the books and so she confronts him; he gives the "others at school do it" excuse.  She brands him a cheater, which makes him upset.

After a bit though, he realizes what he's done is wrong and decides to begin anew; this time he writes about his own dog, Mr. Albert R. Johnson.

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

[The gist of this episode was revealed in the book, Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series]

42-12-21 Fletcher's Shoestrings Spoil Shopping Trip

STARRING BERNARDINE FLYNN AND CLARENCE HARTZELL

Uncle Fletcher promises to take Sade and her good friend Ruthie Stembottom shopping.  However, he fools around with his shoestring and fouls up the proposed timeline, so much so that Ruthie calls and cancels and will go shopping alone.
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In Uncle Fletcher's favor, I will say that Ruthie probably would not have been as quick to leave if this whole episode didn't have to do with last-minute Christmas shopping.  Being December 21st, you know that's exactly what the girls had in mind. 

You can also imagine Uncle Fletcher standing up and telling his niece "Sadie" that he would protect the girls from purse-snatchers and the like.  If it weren't for those darn triple knots...

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

[The gist of this episode was revealed in the book, Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series]

43-08-13 Special Deputy Fletcher

Mayor Greecham makes Uncle Fletcher a "Special Deputy" in which his only real authority is make crowds step back.

Uncle Fletcher seems to have strong thoughts about abusing his power because he felt like the Mayor had specially chosen him.

The Gooks though, notice he really has no authority and seem to bring him back down to earth.

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

[The gist of this episode was revealed in the book, Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series]

41-01-03 Chinbunny Wears Fake Sideburns

In order to look older, Rush tells of his young High School Principal, Mr. Chinbunny,  wearing fake sideburns to school.

Note that this episode comes long after Chinbunny's reach into the world of self-balding and being taught cigar smoking.

The title is one I have given purely for identification purposes.

[The gist of this episode was revealed in the book, Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series]

36-02-21 Willard's Book of Poetry

Sade's been asked to share a review of Willard's book of poetry. Sade cannot make heads nor tails out of the superfluous, probably-pretentious work. When she asks Rush what certain poems mean, he comes up with logical (yet suspect) answers, confusing Sade even more.

Eventually, she gives up on doing the report, sending her son packing with the book but making him tell Mis' Brighton the bad news.
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I assume no one but myself cares about this, but the John T. Hetherington book (link below) reveals that Willard is Mis' Brighton's brother.  What is not revealed though, is why Sade has such a close relationship with him.  She calls him by his first name, calls him "a comfortable friend" and has him over to the house often (yet, always with Mis' Brighton).  I wonder how Sade would feel if Pom Pom or Lolita were called the same by Vic and came over as often?  I'm not suggesting that Willard and Sade are romantically involved, I am only stating some obvious facts.

The title is one I have given the episode purely for identification purposes.

[The gist of this episode was revealed in the book, Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series]